Posts Tagged ‘The Lamb of God’

Behold the Lamb!

Introduction:

This blog post is different from any I have ever posted. This is a study and I decided to share it with you. It is long but it is not a difficult read. Just before Easter I was preparing a Sunday School lesson which I never got to teach because of Covid-19. I became intrigued with John the Baptist’s profound proclamation, “Behold the Lamb” and Isaac’s heartfelt question, “Where is the lamb?” I decided to follow the theme of the lamb through scripture.

This became more than just a Sunday School lesson for me. I became intrigued with the intrinsic detail, planning and structure to the work of God in and through 8,000 years of history. It is not by chance. No human could have put together a puzzle with such interlocking details. I have really appreciated the writings of Jonathan Cahn and some of puzzle pieces came from his book, ” The Book of Mysteries.”

Messiah, the Lamb of God, is the center and foundation of my faith. Jesus is the only way to God. If you are struggling to believe, I pray that this will touch your heart. There are probably aspects of the sacrificial lamb that I have missed. Feel free to share them in the comments.

Behold the Lamb

John 1

One day when Jesus was around 30, he went out into the desert to find his cousin, John the Baptist, who was preaching. Jesus knew his time had come, the time for his ministry to begin and he wanted to be baptized. John was preaching repentance from sins and that one mightier than he was coming who would baptize with the Holy Spirit. The people were wondering and discussing whether John was the Messiah. John tried to put that narrative to rest. John didn’t feel worthy to baptize Jesus, He wanted Jesus to baptize him. John did baptize Jesus and while Jesus was praying the heavens opened and the Holy Spirit descended in the form of a dove and rested on Jesus while a voice said, “This is my beloved Son. I am well pleased with Him.”

It is interesting that Matthew, Mark and Luke all record the baptism of Jesus, but John records another part of the story that the others omit. (John 1:19-36)

The next day, John saw Jesus coming towards him as he was preaching and he said, “Behold the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world”.

John knew he was not the long looked for Messiah nor did he pretend to be. He was a forerunner, a revealer, of the long-awaited Messiah.  John’s exclamation was a divine revelation and deeply symbolic of the mission and purpose of Jesus coming to earth. In verse 31, John admits he did not know Jesus but knew that the Messiah was coming very soon and would be revealed by the Spirit descending in the form of a dove. Jesus was indeed revealed by the Spirit in the form of a dove, and John introduced him to the world, as the Lamb of God.

Why is this significant and what does it mean? I discovered this is a theme that runs through the complete Bible, from beginning to end. It is the foundation of our faith and the only way to have forgiveness of sins. Meet the Messiah, the Lamb of God, which takes away the sins of me and you, and all who receive him as that sacrifice.  

Abraham and Isaac

(Genesis 22)

Two thousand years prior, Abraham woke his son Isaac early one morning to go on a three- day journey to a place that God would show him. God had revealed a message to Abraham-a message that was unimaginably difficult. God had said, “Take you son, your only son Isaac whom you love, and go to a place I will show you and offer him there as a burnt sacrifice”. Abraham heard and understood what God said. He knew Isaac was the long-awaited promised son. Did he lay awake all-night fretting and worrying? Probably, Abraham was human. He knew that sacrificing children was a heathen practice. Did it take a day, a week or a month to act? Somehow, I think he responded in obedience within hours. He was up early in the morning, loaded his donkey with firewood and provisions for the journey, awoke two of his young men and Isaac, and they hit the road.

On the third day, God showed him the mountains in the distance, the mountain range that was called the Land of Moriah. As they neared the mountain, Abraham asked the two young men to wait with the donkey. As father and son were walking in silence the last distance, Isaac, who was carrying a bundle of wood on his back said to his father who was carrying the pot of hot coals for a fire, “Father, where is the lamb”?  Isaac knew the routine. He knew when an alter was built, something had to die. Abraham simply and quietly responded, “My son, God will provide for himself the lamb for the burnt offering.”  You know the story. Abraham built the alter, place the wood and fire on the alter and tied up Isaac. Abraham knew, that he knew, that he knew, he had heard from God and did not question how God would solve the problem, he just knew he would. Hebrews 11:19 reveals that Abraham knowing and understanding the promises of God, believed that God could raise Isaac from the dead. Just as he raised his knife to plunge into the heart of his son, God called out from heaven, “Abraham, Abraham.”  God said, “Do not lay a hand on your son. Now I know you fear God, seeing that you were willing to not withhold even your son from me.”

This story is a foreshadow of Jesus, the only begotten beloved son of God, coming to earth to be that lamb, to become the sacrifice for my sin and your sin. Abraham did not know that, but we understand it looking back at history and through the continued revelation of scripture. From the beginning of time and through the Old Testament prophets, God revealed more and more of “the lamb” to us. Isaac’s question echoed through the years as faithful men and women watched and waited for the Messiah. “When will the Messiah come?” “Where is the Lamb?” 

Where is Lamb? Let’s follow the scarlet thread of redemption, the meaning of the sacrifice of the lamb through scripture and exclaim with John the Baptist, “Behold, the Lamb!”

Sacrifice and The Shedding of Blood

Genesis 3:20

After Adam and Eve sinned, they hid from God. They were suddenly acutely aware of their nakedness and were ashamed. God came looking and calling for them as they feared. God made tunics of skin and clothed them before he chased them out of the garden. The covenant love of God required that innocent animals be sacrificed to provide garments of skin to cover the nakedness of Adam and Eve. The first blood was shed to cover the first sin. The flimsy covering of fig leaves that Adam and Eve attempted to make were not adequate or sufficient. Man’s own works could not cover his sin. An animal had to die; its blood had to be shed to provide a covering for their sin. Was it a lamb? We do not know, but an animal was sacrificed.

Cain and Abel

Genesis 4.

One day the two sons of Adam and Eve, Cain and Abel, had a worship service out in the field. Abel was a keeper of sheep and Cain was a tiller of the soil. Each brought an offering or sacrifice to God. Abel’s was accepted but Cain’s was rejected.  Why? Because Cain had disobeyed God. God had already revealed to man the need for an animal sacrifice in the garden. Cain became so angry at God’s rejection of his sacrifice that he kills his brother. Blood sacrifice was essential for right standing with God. Cain’s self-righteous, deliberate disobedience separated him from the presence of God. Right standing before God, obedience, was shown to be a matter of life and death, not merely a matter of one’s good efforts. The theme of the lamb begins in this chapter and go all the way through scripture to the grand climax in Revelations.

Why is the blood of special value to God?  When God asked Cain where Abel was, Cain retorted, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” And God said, “The voice of Abel’s blood cries out to me from the ground” (Genesis 4:10).

In Leviticus 17: 11, God gives us the significance of the blood, saying; “For the life of the flesh is in the blood; and I have given it for you upon the altar to make atonement for your souls; for it is the blood that makes atonement, by reason of the life”.

Genesis 8. When Noah left the ark after the flood, he offered a sacrifice of burnt offering from the “clean” animals that God had commanded he take into the ark for this purpose. Noah’s sacrifice was pleasing to God and God made a covenant with Noah-the first mention of a covenant- and it was established with blood.

The Institution of the OT Passover

(Exodus 12)

We know the story of Israel’s bondage (slavery) in Egypt and how after 400 years, God visited his people and sent Moses and Aaron to set them free. There were ten plaques, the last of which was the slaying of all the firstborn males of the Egyptians, man and animal. It was at this point that God instituted the sacrifice of lambs and the shedding of blood as a covering for sin. It also started a new calendar for the Israelites. It was Nisan, what we call March-April, and this would now be the new first day of their calendar year to signify a new beginning of Israel’s life as a people.

  • Exodus 12
    • On the tenth day every man shall take a lamb from their herd of sheep. A young Tamin lamb is chosen and taken for the household. Tamin means without spot, unblemished, undefiled, innocent, and perfect, a male of the first year.
    • Four days later, on the fourteenth day, they were to kill the lamb at twilight and the blood put on the two doorposts and the lintel of the house.
    • They were to eat the lamb in haste, all of it and not one of its bones was to be broken. (verse 46). They were to have their clothes on, shoes on their feet and a staff in their hand so that they were really to flee.
    • Only unleavened bread was to be eaten.
    • Blood will be a sign signifying where you live.  God said, “When I see the blood on the door post, I will pass over you.” (verse 13)
    • Obedience to the instructions of the Lord regarding the sacrificial blood of the Passover lamb brought deliverance from the wages of sin and death for those within the house (Exodus 12). The lamb died in their place that they might be saved.
    • Verse 26-27 “And it shall be, when your children ask, what does this mean that you should say, “it is the Passover sacrifice of the Lord.” It is to remember, to remember what God did for them and how the blood saved them.

The Lambs of Bethlehem

Jesus grew up in Nazareth but he was born in Bethlehem. Did you ever wonder or consider the significance of Bethlehem? 

“In the writings of ancient rabbis it is recorded that in the days of the second temple, the only place where one could shepherd a flock was in the wilderness. But there was one exception, the flocks or lambs that were specifically appointed and destined for the Temple sacrifices, the sacrificial lambs. They needed to kept in close proximity to the Holy City (Jerusalem).”  Bethlehem is undoubtedly the place were the temple lambs were raised.” (Book of Mysteries” by Jonathan Cahn, Day 125).

Sheep by nature are helpless, defenseless animals and need the constant watch of a shepherd. It was shepherds who attend to the birthing and care of lambs. The natural birthing season for lambs is in the spring and it was often still cold. Crudely made shelters and caves were used to help protect the sheep. When a lamb needed extra warmth or care, the shepherds would wrap the lambs in strips of cloth called swaddling cloths and lay them in the manger of hay for protection from the other sheep. Is this beginning to sound familiar?

Luke records the story of Jesus birth. Joseph and Mary needed to travel to Joseph’s ancestral home, Bethlehem, to register for the census. There was only one way to travel, by foot or donkey. It was a 90-mile grueling and dangerous trip south along the flatlands of the Jordan River, then west over the hills surrounding Jerusalem, and on into Bethlehem. For Mary who was nine months pregnant and heavy with child it must have been almost unbearable. No where in scripture does it say that Mary rode a donkey. We like to think she did, but in reality, she very possibly walked every step of the way.

God’s timing was perfect. Jesus would not be born until they reached Bethlehem. He had to be born where the sacrificial Tamin lambs were born. Joseph and Mary arrived to discover a city full of other travelers coming for the same purpose. There was no place to stay, all the inns and homes were full. A compassionate innkeeper allowed them to sleep in his stable. That night, in the stillness and quiet of a humble, smelly stable, the Lamb of God was born, wrapped in swaddling clothes and laid in a manger.

Who were the first visitors?  During the wee hours of the night, shepherds who were caring for their sheep in the fields outside of Bethlehem had a divine appointment with angels telling them of the birth of the Messiah and where to find him. Their clue; “You will find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes and lying in a manger.” These were the shepherds appointed to care for the Tumin lambs of Bethlehem and they knew exactly where to look. They hurried to see the new born baby. Was this coincidental? I hardly think so.

The NT Passover: The Death and Crucifixion of Jesus

Jesus was heading to Jerusalem to celebrate the annual Passover celebration. On the 10th day of Nisan (our March-April) Jesus entered Jerusalem. We know it as the Triumphal Entry or Palm Sunday. On Friday he was crucified, buried, and on Sunday he rose from the dead.

Jesus, the Tamin lamb, enters the city-where the house of God was, and would be killed.

Jesus was the first born, a male, without spot or blemish. He knew no sin. He had to be unblemished so that the blemishes of our past could be removed. He had to be spotless so that the stains of our past could be undone. He had to be innocent and undefiled to take away all the defilements in our lives. And so it is from the Passover Lamb, Messiah, that we are given the power of Tamin, the miracle of Tamin, by which the guilty can become innocent again, the defiled can live an unblemished life, with an unblemished record, and an unblemished conscience and with unstained memories. The blood of the Passover Lamb must also be applied to the doorposts of my life.

Jesus would observe the Passover with his disciples on the fourteen day, a Thursday. He broke the bread with his disciples. This had deep meaning for Jesus. He was born in Bethlehem, known as the House of Bread.

Just as Isaac carried the wood for the sacrifice, so Jesus was forced to carry his cross for his sacrifice.

And to fulfill the requirements of the Passover Lamb, none of his bones would be broken.

John 3:16 “For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes on Him will not perish but have everlasting life.”

The is the first mention of the word “love” in scripture.

(Resource: “The Book of Mysteries” by Jonathan Cahn, Day 79, 85, 95, 227)

Day of Atonement

(Leviticus 16)

The Holiest day of the Jewish year was called the “Day of Atonement” or Yon Kippur where an incredibly unique ceremony took place.  Yon Kippur means “covering over”.

On the Day of Atonement, the High Priest would stand before the people with two goats before him. The priest would reach into an urn and pull out two lots. One was placed on the head of the goat on the right and the other on the head of the goat on the left. The one was chosen by lot to be the sin offering for the people and the other as a scapegoat.  The one chosen as a sin offering will be a burnt offering. The one chosen as a sin offering or scapegoat will be present alive before the Lord to make atonement and then let go into the wilderness.

What took place before Jesus’ sacrifice? Two men were presented before the High Priest. Jesus and Barabbas for the determining of two destinies. One would be chosen for the sacrifice and the other let go. Only one could be the sacrifice.

According to the requirements for the ancient sacrifice, the two goats had to be identical.

  • Messiah was the Son of God, the Son of the Father.
  • Barabbas comes from two Hebrew words; bar which means son and abba which means father. Barabbas means the son of the father.

Here we have two men, each bearing the name “The Son of the Father”. The one sacrificed and the one set free must in some way be identical. If God were to die in my place, he had to become like me, flesh and blood, in the likeness of man. He would be my identical and take my place.

The lot was cast. The people shouted set Barabbas free. Jesus was the one sentenced to judgement so that I could be set free.

(Resource: “The Book of Mysteries” by Jonathan Cahn, Day 29.)

Jesus Became Sin

II Corinthians 5:21

“For God made Him (Jesus) who knew no sin, to be sin for us that we might be made the righteousness of God in him (Jesus)”

The Scriptures concerning the sin offering were written in Hebrew. In Hebrew, sin offering is called the Khataah. The Messiah became the Khataah. Khataah has a double meaning.  On one hand it means the sin offering or sacrifice, and on the other hand, it means the sin. The sacrifice and sin both bear the same name, Khataah. Since the sacrifice is the very thing that takes away sin, Jesus had to become sin itself, even though he never sinned. In Hebrew that is basically saying …”every one of your sins bears the name of the sacrifice, Every one of your sins is written (covered) with His Name, His blood. They all belong to Him. We no longer possess them. To keep them is keeping stolen property, an act of theft as they were given to Him.”

 We need to let go of our sin and live in the righteousness of God.

(Resource: “The Book of Mysteries” by Jonathan Cahn, Day 233.)

The Suffering Savior Led as a Lamb to Slaughter

(Isaiah 52:13-53:12)

The Suffering Savior was led as a lamb lead to slaughter. Jesus understood his mission and work as the fulfillment of Isaiah’s prophecy.

The ProphecyThe Fulfillment
52:13 He will be exaltedPhilippians 2:9
52:14 & 53:2  His visage was marred more than any other manMark 15: 17, 19
52:15 He will make a blood atonementI Peter 1:2
53:3 Widely rejected and despisedJohn 12: 37-38
53:4-5 Will bear our sins and sorrowsRomans 4:25; I Peter 2:24-25
53: 6,8 Will be our substituteII Corinthians 5: 21
53:7-8 Will voluntarily accept our guilt and punishmentJohn 10: 11, 19:30
53:9 Buried in a rich man’s tombJohn 19: 38-42
53:10-11 Will save those who believe in HimJohn 3:16. Acts 16:31
53:12 Will die on behalf of transgressorsMark 15:27-28 & Luke 22:37

What scripture was the eunuch from Ethiopia reading when Philip was led to his chariot?  Isaiah 53. Philip explained the verses, and the eunuch understood and was convicted. He asked for baptism. Philip said, “you may if you believe with all your heart.” The eunuch answered, “I believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God.” Acts 8:26-40

The Second Coming

Matthew, Mark, and John refer to the site of crucifixion as Golgotha and Luke calls it Calvary. There is some difference of opinion as to the location of the exact spot but most scholars believe that Golgotha was actually on the Mount of Olives in the area known as the Upper Land of Moriah, which was just east of the city of Jerusalem. Remember where Abraham went with Isaac. Could it have been the same spot? The Garden of Gethsemane is at the foot of the Mt. of Olives.

The prophet Zechariah adds another interesting tidbit to the narrative:

“Then the LORD will go forth and fight against those nations, as He fights in the day of battle. And in that day His feet will stand on the Mount of Olives, which faces Jerusalem on the east” (Zechariah 14:3-4)

The Mount of Olives was also the location from which Jesus ascended to heaven after being resurrected from the grave and appearing to His disciples (Acts 1:9-12). Jesus will return to the same location from which He previously left the earth and where he offered His life as the ultimate sacrifice.

The Revelation Lamb

A number of years after Jesus returned to heaven, severe persecution attacked the believers. Many were killed and even some of the disciples. John, the beloved disciple, was exiled to the island of Patmos for his unrelenting faith and open witness of Jesus.  God revealed to him in a vision what is going to happen at the end of time and in heaven and told him to write it down so that it could be given to the churches.

Someday Jesus, the sacrificial lamb, will be revealed to all whose sins have been covered by his blood. We will see and know and understand the full impact of the sacrifice he made, in love.

 Rev. 5:6:  “And I looked and behold in the midst of the throne and of the four living creatures, and in the midst of the elders stood a Lamb as though it had been slain…” and verse 12 is a scene beyond our comprehension. “And I looked and heard the voice of many angels around the throne, the living creatures, and the elders, and the number of them was ten thousand times ten thousand, and thousand of thousands (literally gazillions) on their faces saying “worthy is the Lamb who was slain….”

What a scene!  In this scene the lamb, the most defenseless of all creatures, so weak it must be protected by shepherds is on the throne. The lamb is king and reigns over all. The Lamb, the symbol of the Messiah.

  • Revelations 5:9
  • Revelations 6: 15-17
  • Revelations 7: 9-17
  • Revelations 17:14
  • Revelations 21:7-9, 22-27

Forgiveness of Sin

Hebrews 9:22 “Without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness of sins”

At the time of God’s choosing, Jesus, who was without spot or blemish (1 Peter 1:19), became the perfect Passover lamb sacrifice; meeting all the requirements set forth by God for a Passover lamb to fulfill the blood sacrifice requirement for the remission of sin (Hebrews 9:22). His blood sacrifice was made so that when we believe and obey; accept the substitute shedding of blood for our sins, we will be saved from the wages of sin and death. God made a way for mankind to enjoy Him forever, establishing a new covenant with man for the remission of sin, by giving us His son (Luke 22:19-20), the perfect Passover lamb sacrifice.

I Peter 1:18-20 “We are not redeemed with corruptible things like silver or gold but with the precious blood of Christ, as a lamb without blemish and without spot.”

The entire purpose of Jesus life, from the moment of his birth to his death was to give Himself, to give His life as a sacrifice. What a gift of love!

These facts were revealed, not hidden, to John the Baptist. When he said, “Behold the Lamb of God which takes away the sins of the world” it was loaded with significant and meaning.  John knew Jesus was “the Lamb of God.”

John was born into a priestly family.  The priest were the ones who ministered in the temple and were in charge of the offerings and presenting the sacrifices. A priest had to be thirty years old to perform the duties of a priest. If you remember, John was born about six months before Jesus. (Luke 1) making him eligible to perform priestly duties. John the Baptist, a pure-blooded priest of the lineage of Aaron presented and identified Jesus as the Lamb of God, the Messiah, the acceptable final sacrifice to Israel. God made sure to have a priest of Aaron certify the Lamb according to the Old Testament requirements to fulfill the New Testament covenant. That means your sins are completely and certifiable taken away forever by the Lamb who came with priestly certification. There would now be no more lamb sacrifices to take away sin. It is done, once and forever for all who repent and let the blood of Jesus take away their sin. In the Old Testament the blood covered everyone. In the New Testament it is by choice. Your choice. What will you choose?

(Resource: “The Book of Mysteries” by Jonathan Cahn, Day 66, 130.)

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God took what was not his-our sins

so that we could have what was not ours-love.

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Resources:

  • The Bible (Word of God)
  • “The Book of Mysteries” by Jonathan Cahn, Days 16, 29, 37, 61, 66, 79,85, 95, 125, 130, 223, 227, and 233.
  • Picture came from pixabay.com a website for free pictures.

By Pat Hertzler, September 12, 2020

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