Archive for Country Living

Full Worm Super Moon – March 9, 2020

I love taking pictures of the moon. Tonight was no exception. It is technically called the Full Worm Super Moon, named as such by Traditional and Native Americans. They had a name for each full moon to help track the seasons. In March as the ground began to soften, earthworms would appear, drawing more birds to feed.

Then God said, "Let there be light", and there was light. 
And  God saw the light, that it was good; 
and God divided the light from the darkness.
God called the light Day, and the darkness He called Night. 
So the evening and the morning were the first day.
Genesis 1:3-5

Nighty Night, Groundhog

This afternoon I was out in the yard and discovered a groundhog had tried to dig two holes under the storage building in the yard. One he had just started and the other was a small hole but I didn’t think he had succeeded yet in getting under the shed.  The holes were in my hollyhock bed.  I filled the holes in and went to gather eggs and feed my hens. I came back about twenty minutes later and the larger hole was redug and enlarged. He was definitely now under the shed. That rascal is fast.

I filled the hole in again and went to water the greenhouse and feed the baby chicks. I came back and the hole was reopened and he had worked on the second hole again. I went to Gene with my problem.  I baited and set a trap by the closed up hole and left. About twenty minutes later, the hole was opened again. That was four times in maybe an hour.

Hubby to the rescue.

 

Hubby hooked the hose to the exhaust on the truck and stuck the hose under the building through his hole and carefully packed dirt and mulch around to seal it. He piped the fumes under the shed for probably two hours. At one point the groundhog did some frantic scratching and pushing on the metal but then all was quiet. Hopefully he went nighty night, permanently, before he had a chance to do lots of damage and destroy my garden and flower beds. I could hardly believe how fast he worked.

My prized hollyhocks are stock from Dad Hertzler’s in Denbigh that he brought to Powhatan fifty plus years ago. When the hollyhocks and roses start blooming I think summer is here; blooming after the daffodils, tulips and peonies.

 

 

One hour later…..

I came in, smugly wrote my blog post and went back out to check on my success.

He won!

Rascal!

I hope he is running for his life cause I am hot on his trail!

Spring on the Farm-2019

I  love the sights, sounds and smells of springtime on the farm.

Sights: lush green grass, buttercups and daffodils, white clouds drifting across a blue sky, trees bursting with leaves and flowers, baby calves frolicking in the field, billows of green pollen drifting across the field, asparagus popping out of the ground, and birds busy nesting.

Sounds: birds chirping, chickens clucking, bulls bellowing, their testosterone raging, bees buzzing, and wind blowing.

Smells: freshly mowed lawn, flowers, spring rain, and freshly tilled garden soil.

Some pictures from the farm this month.

Raised bed of lettuce and radishes,

Raised bed of spring onions.

Asparagus stalks.


The bull was bellowing and pawing the ground.

Wisteria tree at the edge of the woods.

Heifers grazing among the buttercups.

Field work….trying to smooth out the rough areas where the cows really rutted up the ground during the wet winter.

Full moon.

Full moon approaching Easter.

Strawberries blooming.

Bees pollinating the blackberries.

 

An Evening in Victoria

Let me tell you a story.

This past Saturday evening we decided to go to Victoria, a small town nestled deep in the heart of central Virginia, about an hour’s drive from our farm. It was a spur of the moment decision. Gene came in from feeding the cows and asked if I wanted to go. He had heard about a country bluegrass group singing at Victoria Restaurant that evening on WSVS,  a small town station located in Crewe at 800 AM that plays country and bluegrass music. The afternoon DJ each day is Bobby Wilcox from our hometown of Powhatan.

It was a cold, dreary, rainy evening but what we found in small town USA was a warm and welcoming reception.  We arrived one hour early thinking we had plenty of time for the buffet supper. Actually we were about the last to arrive and most had already eaten.  We didn’t realize we needed to make reservations but we were welcomed in with the assurance that they would find us a spot in the already packed room.  They first found us a table in the side room where the musicians were eating and preparing for their performance, to eat our supper.

The buffet was a true southern feast: fried chicken, meatloaf, mash potatoes and gravy, sweet potatoes, green beans,  white navy beans, macaroni and cheese, hot homemade rolls, banana pudding, and blackberry cobbler. The musician in charge of the group interacted with us, asking where we were from and what brought us to the event. When he discovered we were from Powhatan, he made the instant connection to Bobby Wilcox and mentioned that he was in house that evening. It was obvious that Bobby was a well-known and loved radio celebrity in that part of the country! He went and found us a spot to sit…. at Bobby Wilcox’s reserved table.

The opening band was “First Time Around”, a local group who sang country gospel music for one hour. They did an excellent job and were very open in sharing their faith through testimony and singing.

The feature group was “Appalachian Express”, a well-known country bluegrass group with a list of credentials and awards to fill a book. They entertained us well for almost two hours.

At one point during the evening, they expressed appreciation for all the musicians and singers in attendance that evening, and there were quite a few.  Most we didn’t know (except for Rusty Yoder), but those mentioned were well-known by those who follow bluegrass music.  We discovered that seated beside us was one of the extended Clark family who has personally preformed on Hee Haw.  Victoria is in the area of Virginia where Hee Haw’s Roy Clark, now deceased, lived. As they wound down the evening, they raised the roof with the foot-stomping “Rocky Top Tennessee”. Then they asked all the veterans to stand. As the 50 or more older men, out of the group of 125 or more, rose to their feet their faces showed emotion as they were thanked and the audience clapped their appreciation. The leader of the group, the man in red in the picture, asked one of the veterans to retrieve the flag in the side room. As he stood straight and tall off to the side, they sang “America the Beautiful”.  The audience instantly rose as one, hats came off and right hands were placed on hearts in respect and honor for our great nation for whom many had fought and suffered. The “man in red” closed by saying, “Thank you and good night to everyone. Tomorrow, attend a church of your choice.”

I snapped this picture just before the veteran removed his hat and handed it to his wife.

It was a special evening and as we traveled home we talked about the evening. Not one person used the venue to mention politics, speak an unkind or vile word, make a crude or belittling insult towards any person or group. No one stomped on the flag. In fact, it was quite the opposite. There was respect for the flag and honor for our veterans who gave so much for our freedom.  There was love for our country with no resisters or jeers of protest.  And most of all, faith in God was openly expressed without shame or fear. God’s redeeming love was proclaimed and no one was threatened with hate.

Rural hometown USA is different than how the media portrays in the news. This was “God and country” territory; the America we know, love and cherish.

A little bit about Victoria Restaurant…..

They are located in the heart of  a little city with 17 streets. They are located 1411 8th St. Victoria, VA 23974. On Friday evenings, locals play and sing as you dine and there is no charge for the entertainment. On Saturday evenings, they have scheduled groups and there is a $10 per person fee plus the food.

They also have a facebook page where you can follow their schedule of events.

Powhatan County Labor Day Parade-2018

The Powhatan County Labor Day Parade….Powhatan patriotism and community unity at its best.

11 a.m. sharp….Siren’s wail announces the start of the parade.

Honks blowing, sirens shrieking, motors reviving,  cycle rumblings, bands marching, hands waving, neighbors chatting and candy throwing…. Powhatan County spirit in full display….the modern, the antique, the young and the older!

A few pictures….

These guys had a blast doing doughnut circles all over the road.

Powhatan Mennonite Church float featured Operation Christmas Child Shoe Boxes. Our church is the drop-off location for Powhatan County. It is almost time to start think about filling shoe boxes again. You may get instructions on how to participate at the Samaritans Purse website or call the church (804-598-3365) to pickup empty shoe boxes and labels. Information will also be on our church website (www.pmchurch.net) very soon. Collection week will be November 12-19, 2018.

Pre-parade…ready to roll.

Here we come!

Chick-Fil-A mascot

 

 

 

 

Summer 2018

A glimpse of my summer through the lens of my camera.

Onions that went to seed.

Sunset

Day Lilies

Fresh blackberries from my garden.

Queen Anne’s Lace (Wildflower)

Just chillin’ on a hot day. It is called bearding.

Hundreds of humming, buzzing bees sitting on their porch!

Evening Primrose

A frequent visitor to my bird feeder.

I love when my hostas bloom.

 

 

Rose of Sharon

Baby wrens.

Buzzard in a dead tree. Settling in for the night.

Wild turkeys

Storm Clouds

Huge mushroom from all the wet weather.

Wild Canadian geese grazing in the pasture.

Sunflower

Homemade rolls almost ready to bake.

Coral Star peaches from the Shenandoah Valley.

Full moon

 

“O Lord, our Lord, how excellent is your name in all the earth.

You have set your glory above the heavens.

Psalms 8:1

 

Evening Primrose

One of my favorite flowers is the Evening Primrose. If you have never seen one open, you are missing a very special treat. They open in the evening just before dusk. Right now it is around 8:45 p.m. You can literally watch them pop open.

The head of each stalk contains lots of little blossom pods.  Before opening the pod swells up.  In the picture above you can see the already open flower and the one ready to pop open in about half a minute. The two larger pods behind with the reddish tint will open tomorrow evening and the next larger ones in two evenings.

The stages of opening:

 

 

 

 

Just about as fast as you looked at these pictures, it happened.

The flowers only last one day. By tomorrow evening it will be drooped and wilted and start to fall off. (Picture below)

Years and years ago, a friend gave me a start and I have had them ever since.  They are bi-annuals meaning they bloom the second year. After they finish blooming the little pods you see sticking on the side of the stalk in the picture below will fill with very tiny black seeds.

This fall they will shatter to the ground. The plants that come up this fall or very early next spring will bloom next summer. The ones that sprout later-maybe April or May will stay little all summer and bloom next year. (See picture below).  These are tucked in the flower bed under the blooming plants.

The flowers are very fragrant and at the peak of blooming the plants are loaded with bright yellow blossoms. But this is one plant you have to sit outside in the evening to enjoy. By the time the sun is up in the morning they are on the decline.

One thing you have to remember is, you don’t just watch one blossom open. Everyone of those flowers opened tonight plus  more that aren’t on the picture.

The hummingbird moths love this plant. They look like a cross between a hummingbird and moth with the body of a moth and beak and hovering of a hummingbird.  Under cover of dark, shortly after blooming, they buzz in and fill their beaks with the luscious, sweet nectar. I have two kinds of hummingbird moths; one with a short beak that buries his head into the blossom and the other with long, dangling beak that hovers above the flower and drops his beak into the blossom.  The picture below is the long beaked moth. I don’t have a picture of the short-beaked one.

The Evening Primrose also comes in pink (which I don’t have) and it is a low spreading plant where the yellow one grows 3 feet tall. They are also considered a wildflower and if you are looking for them, you can find them in the ditch banks along roadways in unmowed areas. Most people never notice them because they are night-time blooming.

This 1-minute video shows a flower opening in real time. There was no editing, no shortening of time.

If you want to see this spectacular God-show, I would love to have you stop by (call first to be sure I’m home). Right now they are at their peak and by mid-July it will be almost over. It will be an evening you will always remember.

Drivers Ed on the Farm

Grandkids, Karla and Ryan, are here with us for several days while their folks are celebrating their anniversary in Cancun. My instructions from her mom was to teach Karla to drive. She can get her learners in March but has zero driving experience nor a good place to learn. The biggest and fastest vehicle she has driven has been my golf cart.

 

Lesson 1: I drove the pickup across the cattle guard to the driveway into the cattle pasture. I turned off the truck, hopped out and said, “Let’s change sides.”

K: Grandma, I’m terrified.  I don’t think I can do this.

G: Yes, you can. It’s not hard.

I told her how to start the truck, what the letters (P, R, N, D, L) meant and what the brake and accelerator were. Immediately the right foot went on the “go” pedal (according to her) and the left on the brake.  I smiled to myself but didn’t say anything. Sitting on the front of her seat, she grasped the steering wheel for dear life and started the truck.  It immediately started moving forward very slowly.

K; Grandma. It’s moving. How do I stop? I’m terrified!

I think she used the terrified word at least two dozen times!

G:  You are doing just fine. But you can push the brake to stop.

Her left foot instantly pushed the brake to the floor.  We were probably going one mph but we also immediately lurked to a stop! By now we are both laughing so hard she can hardly drive.  The next lesson is on using only the right foot for both petals and pushing the pedal evenly.

K: “But grandma, what if my foot is on the “go” pedal when I need to stop?”

G:  “Your foot can move from one pedal to another”.

The concept of only using one foot seemed totally unrealistic to her. After all, you have two feet and two pedals! I explained the safety issue involved with using two feet. You don’t want to push both petals at the same time!

Karla did a great job. She made it to the end of the field and back several times at the neck-breaking speed of 4 mph. I assured her she was not going fast and that on interstate you go 70 mph and that eventually she would have confidence and experience.  Suddenly going 70 mph and entering traffic on interstate seemed like an paralysising feat and she just did not know how her dad did it.

When we were done, I had her drive over the sixteen foot wide cattle guard back to the yard and park beside our car.  She was sure she was going to hit the side post of the gateway but she did it perfectly.

This was a hilariously funny event. I laughed and laughed at her crazy thoughts and expressions.

Lesson 2:  We had a lesson on reverse, signaling, the horn and windshield wipers. This time I let her drive to the field which meant she had to back out of the parking space beside our car.

K: “But, grandma, I can’t see behind and I might hit something!”

We talked about how to see behind using the mirrors or turning your head and looking. She just knew there was going to be something in the wide open space behind her that she couldn’t see and was going to hit! We made it to the pasture and this time went further; through a second gate opening into the back pasture.  We saw two wild turkeys and a coyote which was an extra little bonus.  She loved the turn signal. When we came to the end of the road and she had to turn around in the pasture, she stopped and put on her signal. We did squares in the pasture and at each turn, she signaled. But she had to stop in order to signal. I explained that when she is driving on the road, she will use the signal to let other drivers know she is planning to make a turn. This also means you have to turn it on while you are driving and before you get to where you are going to turn.

The cows were out grazing in the field and several crossed the driveway we were on. She pretended it was a pedestrian crossing. Again, she was sure she was going to hit one of them but I showed her how to keep easing forward very slow and they would move. On the last lap back to the house she reached the unfathomable speed of 10 mph. She beamed with pride!

Lesson 3: This time there was a big improvement in her confidence. She adjusted the seat and leaned back. She maneuvered the truck out of the parking spot and into the field. This time we went exploring across the pastures. She had to ford a small creek with a somewhat narrow opening and was astounded that I thought she could do it. The cattle were also out moving around and at the same time they were wanting to cross the same creek. We had to sit and wait until the last cow had crossed so that she could go. One cow was being stubborn and was standing in the way, facing the truck and still eating the grass hanging out her mouth. Karla beeped the horn and the cow, with a defiant posture and stern look, immediately responded with several loud moos. We laughed and laughed. I just wish I had my camera! Grandpa had driven in the field that morning checking the cows and left tire tracks across the field. She had great fun following them as they wandered across several different pastures.

Lesson 4: This time I handed her the keys to the car. Her eyes got as big as saucers. This was very different from the pickup. It sits lower, is smoother driving, the wipers are on a different lever and the lever to put the car in gear is on the console. She was sure she might hit something but took to the change with ease. She eased up to 20 mph for a few brief moments. This time after driving the pasture driveway, we went out and back the driveway. I noticed she actually turned on the signal while driving.

Karla is going to do just fine. We will have several more lessons tomorrow before she goes home. Each time we drove, I could see her gaining confidence and that she was very happy and pleased with herself.  It was a priceless privilege to be the one to share this first time experience with her. I will always treasure the memory.  I just wish I could have taped all her comments.

Ryan, who is two years younger was just yearning for the privilege of driving.  I told him yesterday that if he helped to complete the mulching job we were working on, I would let him drive. I had a very hard-working, willing worker! Where Karla was cautious and unsure of herself, Ryan was bubbling with eagerness and anticipation.

When we had completed our lesson, he hopped out of the truck and with a huge smile said, “that was awesome!”

Farm kids have a huge advantage over others in learning to drive. They are privileged to the open land and learn at a young age to drive a lawn mover, four-wheeler, motorcycle, trucks and other farm equipment. By the time they reach driving age, they have accumulated a vast variety of  experiences, including; backing trailers, maneuvering narrow spaces and different weather and terrain conditions.

I remember learning to drive. Daddy had an old stick-shift dodge truck that shifted hard that he let me roam the pastures in. It was almost impossible to put into gear without grinding at least a little.  The truck was parked in a narrow lean-to on the side of the bank barn that was on a downhill slope. I had to learn to back the truck into the shed which had about 12 inches (or less!) to spare on each side of the rear view mirrors and pull out of the shed without coasting backwards. Only those who have driven a stick shift can appreciate how truly difficult that was. I am still amazed I learned to do it without ever hitting the barn or coasting backwards.

Peonies

I have numerous favorite flowers but I have to say the exquisite, perennial peony has to be top, even though roses and daisies follow close behind.  I can remember my mother having a long row of the fragrant bushes on the farm where I grew up.  When I got married and moved to Powhatan, I discovered that Gene’s dad had planted a stunning row of them beside the house several years prior.

I can always count on them starting to bloom the week before Mother’s Day. They don’t last more than 2-3 weeks but the fragrance is like no other flower. It just begs for you to bury your nose in the soft, velvety petals and breathe deeply. They do really well as cut flowers and make a stunning, fragrant bouquet that catches your attention when you step into the room.

 

It is best (they last longer) to pick the flowers while they are still buds. This will also decrease the amount of ants you carry into the house! Ants are attracted to the sticky sweetness and also help to open the buds. The first, “on my own,” gardening year, I sprayed them with pesticide to kill the pesky rascals. That was a mistake! I learned the importance and value of ants.  To determine when the bud is ready to pick, take hold of the bud between your thumb and first finger and gently pinch. If it is squishy, not hard, it is ready. Within a day of being cut, they will open to a full flower.  (I just recently learned this trick from a gardening friend, Lisa Ziegler).

My row of peonies is at least 48 years old, maybe older.  I have never divided them, although it probably would be a good idea. I am afraid I might mess up a good thing. They say peonies need very little care and can produce for 100 years.

In October after the stalks have died, I cut the dead foliage off as close to the ground as possible. That is all I do to prepare them for winter and the following spring.  If you are want to transplant or divide the plants, October is the month. The first year after replanting they probably will not bloom.  You need to be very careful in replanting that you only cover the roots with 2-3 inches of dirt or they will not bloom.  Peonies love sun but also like some shade protection during the hottest part of the day. Mine are planted on the north side of the house but because they are about 6 feet away from the house they have the benefit of a lot of sun and a little shade. It has been a perfect spot.

Peonies come in different colors and varieties, the most popular and hardy, being the old-fashion white. I also have a lovely, soft, light pink and a medium pink. The red I have replanted several times, I just can’t seem to keep it.

 

Rain is not kind to peonies once they start to bloom. Because of the very large flowers and multiple blossoms per stalk, the rain weights them down and the blossoms quickly turn brown. This year was especially hard on them. We have had 5 inches of rain in the last week just as they are at their peak. Even the buds hang their heads.

I like using peony rings with my plants. You can’t see them and it helps to hold the heavy stalks and keep them from falling over. I prefer the open two-ring style that looks like a tomato cage, only shorter, rather that the one with the grid top.

Resource:

 

Super Blue Moon-March 31, 2018

This shows my ignorance but I really thought the moon would have a blue tint to it, after all it is called a “blue moon”.  The full moon was huge tonight and beautiful and I got several really nice pictures. I didn’t have any city skyline or magnificent building for a back drop, just a quiet country sky with a million stars shining.

When the moon wasn’t blue, not even a hint of  blue, I went to my friend “google” and did some research. When there are two full moons in one month, the second full moon is called a “blue moon”.  Now, that is not even creative in my mind but what am I to know!

This doesn’t happen often.  Ironically there were two full moons in January (January 2 and 31) of this year, none in February and two in March (March 2 and 31).  This will not happen again until October 2020. The added excitement for tonight’s full moon is that it is just hours from dawn on Easter Sunday. There is a more detailed explanation at the following website 201 2nd Blue Moon on March 31. There is a phenomena when there can actually be a bluish colored moon when there is volcanic dust or smoke in the atmosphere. The other phenomena is when you photo-shop the picture. This is my blue moon!!!

I also love the picture I took of the moon last night as it slid in and out of clouds. I had gotten confused and thought it was blue moon night.

 

A true story….. June 2, 2018

A friend related this story to me the other when we were talking about the very wet weather and all the flooding in May.  Years ago my friend, I ‘ll call him H, was chatting with an old-timer, Albert May in Powhatan. Albert asked him if they had their corn in the river bottom low ground harvested yet. Albert went on to explain that there had recently been two full moons (that is called a blue moon) in one month and that meant very wet weather and flooding was coming and they had better get their corn harvested. H said he went home and related the story and they had a good laugh at the old man’s wisdom.  Several weeks later their corn was standing in water with only the top of the tassel showing. H said, “I have never forgotten that.” H said, “I knew this wet spring (May 2018) was coming as I have never forgotten that experience.”

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